10.00 - 12.00
SESSION BLOCK 4
Click on session title for more information
33 - From Mechanical Arts to Present Maker Movements: Forgotten Genealogies of Art, Technology, and Science

In cooperation with: ArtScience Museum, Singapore

Organizer: Denisa Kera (National University of Singapore)

Presenters:

Kaitlyn Marie Braybrooke (University of Sussex, United Kingdom) and Sally Jane Norman (University of Sussex, United Kingdom): Technologies and Performative Play: Re-Creation and Subversion of Institutionalized Cultures / Cultural Institutions

Denisa Kera (National University of Singapore) and Markéta Dolejšová (National University of Singapore): Prototypes of Science Instruments in Renaissance Science and Present DIYbio— Integrating Technology, Arts, and Crafts

Emile Devereaux (University of Sussex, United Kingdom): Participatory Cartography in Design Anthropology: Maps and Media for Speculative Futures

Kate O’Riordan (University of Sussex, United Kingdom): Fabulation and Fabrication: Biosensors, Experience, and Materialisms

Jennifer Parker (University of California, Santa Cruz, United States): Enacting Digital Art and Civic Opportunities: Data as Material for Action

34 - International Perspectives on the History of Gender and Technology

Co-Sponsors: The Berkshire Conference of Women Historians and The Society for the History of Technology

Organizers: Susan Yohn (Hofstra University, United States) and Emily K. Gibson (Georgia Institute of Technology, United States)

Chair: Arwen P. Mohun (University of Delaware, United States)

Comment: Ruth Schwartz Cowan (University of Pennsylvania, United States)

Presenters:

Margaret Vining (Smithsonian Institution, United States) and Barton C. Hacker (Smithsonian Institution, United States): Bridging the Ocean: Technology and Nineteenth-Century Women’s Transatlantic Activism

Sujin Lee (Cornell University, United States): Birth Strike: Yamakawa Kikue’s Socialist Feminist Critique of Sex and Class

Laura Bier (Georgia Institute of Technology, United States): The Pleasures of Domesticity: Household Appliance Advertisements, Gender, and the Democratization of Well Being in Nasser’s Egypt

Emily K. Gibson (Georgia Institute of Technology, United States): “L’art de faire un bon voyage”: Air France’s Hôtesses de l’Air and the Domestication of Flight and Travel within the Declining French Empire, 1946–1960

35 - Roundtable: Craft and Art in Innovation, and Innovation in the Arts and Crafts—Exploring New Engagements for the History of Technology

Organizers: Annapurna Mamidipudi (Maastricht University, Netherlands) and Wiebe Bijker (Maastricht University, Netherlands)

Panelists:

Annapurna Mamidipudi (Maastricht University, Netherlands)

Sushruti Santhanam (Savitribai Phule Pune University, India)

Pamela O. Long (Independent Scholar, United States)

Pamela Smith (Columbia University, United States)

Uzramma (Independent Scholar, India)

John Bosco Lourdusamy (Indian Institute of Technology Madras, India)

Francesca Bray (University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom)

36 - Technology for City, City for Technology

Organizer: Buhm Soon Park (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea)

Chair and comment: Takehiko Hashimoto (University of Tokyo, Japan)

Presenters:

Stuart W. Leslie (Johns Hopkins University, United States) and Yin Hang Phoebe Tang (Johns Hopkins University, United States): Staking a Claim to Biotech: Singapore and San Diego’s Science Cities

Robert Cowley (King’s College London, United Kingdom): Science Fiction and the Smart-Eco City

Buhm Soon Park (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea), Youjung Shin (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea), and Taemin Woo (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea): A Political Life of “Galaxy City”: Science Policy, City Planning, and Two Presidential Elections

Simon Joss (University of Westminster, United Kingdom), Robert Kargon (Johns Hopkins University, United States), and Arthur Molella (Smithsonian Institution, United States): “Smart City”: Tracing the Historical Roots of the Contemporary Paradigm of Urban Technology

37 - Presidential Roundtable: Rethinking Society for the 21st Century

Organizers: Johan Schot (University of Sussex, United Kingdom), Suzanne Moon (University of Oklahoma, United States) and Francesca Bray (University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom)

Chair: Bruce Seely (Michigan Technological University, United States)

Panelists:

Johan Schot (University of Sussex, United Kingdom)

Suzanne Moon (University of Oklahoma, United States)

Itty Abraham (National University of Singapore)

38 - Fashioning Global Patent Cultures: Diversity and Harmonization in Historical Perspective

Organizers: Graeme Gooday (University of Leeds, United Kingdom) and Steven Wilf (University of Connecticut, United States)

Chair: Graeme Gooday (University of Leeds, United Kingdom)

Comment: Steven Wilf (University of Connecticut, United States)

Presenters:

Kjell Ericson (Yale University, United States): Science Applied in Aid of Nature: The First Pearl Patent and the Place of Industrial Property in Meiji Japan

Bernardita Escobar Andrae (University of Santiago, Chile): Alternative Patent Cultures in the Chilean Patent System, 1840–1910”

Courtney Fullilove (Wesleyan University, United States): Specimens of Ingenuity, and Their Consumption: Fire and Restoration in the U.S. Patent Office

Tania Sebastian (Gujerat National Law University, India): The India Twist to Patent Culture

39 - Technology and Capitalism as U.S. Foreign Relations: Transatlantic and Transpacific Perspectives

Organizers: Corinna Schlombs (Rochester Institute of Technology, United States) and William Chou (The Ohio State University, United States, and University of Tokyo, Japan)

Chair and comment: Keith Breckenridge (University of Witwatersrand, South Africa)\

Presenters:

Corinna Schlombs (Rochester Institute of Technology, United States): The Promise of Productivity: Technology and the American Capitalist Model in U.S.-German Relations

Ying Jia Tan (Wesleyan University, United States): Sino‐American Technological Diplomacy and the Nationalization of China’s Electrical Industries, 1941–1945

William Chou (The Ohio State University, United States, and University of Tokyo, Japan): Constructing and Consuming the American Japanese Car: Transpacific Technology and Marketing, 1957–1982

Pierre Mounier‐Kuhn (National Center for Scientific Research and Université Paris‐Sorbonne, France): Transatlantic Configurations: Information Technologies between the U.S. and Peripheral Countries

40 - On the Co-Evolution of Technology and Culture: Technological Development, Birth Control, and Venereal Diseases Prophylaxis

Organizer: Wolfgang König (Technische Universität Berlin, Germany)

Chair and comment: Suzanne Gottschang (Smith College, United States)

Presenters:

Wolfgang König (Technische Universität Berlin, Germany): The Condom’s Difficult Path to Become a High-Tech Product in 20th Century Germany

Haiyan Yang (Peking University, China): Making the Pill: A Comparative Study on the Development of the Contraceptive Pill in China and the United States

Shoan Yin Cheung (Cornell University, United States): A Therapeutic for a New Millennium: The Birth Control Pill as “Medicine” in Contemporary Japan

Donna J. Drucker (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany): No Barrier to Innovation: The Trials of the Cervical Cap, 1976–1988

41 - Imagination/Meaning: Technological Dreamscapes, Fictions, and Futures

Organizer and chair: Annie Tomlinson (Cornell University, United States)

Comment: W. Patrick McCray (University of California, Santa Barbara, United States)

Presenters:

Finn Arne Jørgensen (Umeå University, Sweden): When the Humanities Went Digital (A History of Technology Told in the Future Tense)

Samantha Breslin (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada): Planning Creativity and Innovation: Imagining Technological Development in Singapore, 1986–2025

Jacob Ward (University College London, United Kingdom): “The future must be invented, not predicted”: Human Imagination and Computer Prediction in the British Post Office, 1967–1983

Annie Tomlinson (Cornell University, United States): The “Death Ray” and the Test Ban: Imagining America’s Neutron Bomb as Technopolitical Artifact and Regime, 1957–1963

42 - Robots in Asia: History, Culture, and Politics (Part I)

Organizer and chair: Chihyung Jeon (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea)

Comment: Ann Johnson (Cornell University, United States)

Presenters:

Anna Guevarra (University of Illinois at Chicago, United States): Simulations of Care: Labor, Globalization, and the Politics of Innovation in Korean Robotics

Heesun Shin (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea) and Chihyung Jeon (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea): Robots, Save Us: Visions of Disaster Robotics in South Korea

Huang Yu (The Chinese University of Hong Kong) and Naubahar Sharif (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China): Replacing Humans with Robots: Technological Change and Industrial Organization in the Pearl River Delta of China

Selma Šabanović (Indiana University, United States): Robotics Firsts: Tracing the Development of Robotics through Oral History Interviews

43 - Things on Display: Exhibitions as a Research Tool in the History of Technology

Organizers: Andreas Marklund (Post & Tele Museum, Denmark) and Louise Karlskov Skyggebjerg (Danish Museum of Science and Technology, Denmark)

Chair: Mats Fridlund (Aalto University, Finland)

Comment: Deborah Douglas (MIT Museum, United States)

Presenters:

Andreas Marklund (Post & Tele Museum, Denmark): Exhibitions as a Space for Data Creation: Investigating Information Age Intangibles

Frode Weium (Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, Norway) and Henrik Treimo (Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, Norway): Exhibitions as Recontextualizations: A Recontextualized Telescope—Connecting Things, Exhibitions, and Research

Louise Karlskov Skyggebjerg (Danish Museum of Science and Technology, Denmark): Exhibition Work as a Way to Engage in Talks with Objects: Thinking with Objects

44 - Histories, Poverties, Technologies

Organizers: Waqar Zaidi (Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan) and Nina Lerman (Whitman College, United States)

Chair: Nina Lerman (Whitman College, United States)

Comment: Waqar Zaidi (Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan)

Presenters:

Anindita Nag (German Historical Institute, United States): Reading the Numbers: Statistics and the Politics of Food Scarcity in Colonial India

Dora Vargha (University of London, United Kingdom): Iron Lungs across the Iron Curtain: Respiratory Technologies in Times of Global Polio Epidemics

Kapil Subramanian (King’s College London, United Kingdom): Private Tubewells and the Green Revolution

Kirsten Moore-Sheeley (Johns Hopkins University, United States): Disaggregating the “Rural Poor”: The History of Insecticide-Treated Bed Net Use in Western Kenya

13.30 - 15.00
SESSION BLOCK 5
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45 - The Practical Application of Natural Philosophical Knowledge in Early Modern Europe

Organizer and comment: Adam Lucas (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Presenters:

Gerhard Wiesenfeldt (University of Melbourne, Australia): Mathematics at Leiden around 1600: Technical Expertise and the Formation of Dutch Academic Culture

Luciano Boschiero (Campion College, Australia): Machines, Motion, and the Académie des Sciences, 1666–1686

David Philip Miller (University of New South Wales, Australia): The Natural Philosophy of Steam in the 18th Century

 

46 - Presidential Roundtable: Why Feminist Perspectives on Technology Still Matter—A Global Conversation

Organizer: Arwen P. Mohun (University of Delaware, United States)

Chair: Francesca Bray (University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom)

Panelists:

Chia-Ling Wu (National Taiwan University, Taiwan)

Annapurna Mamidipudi (Maastricht University, Netherlands)

Arwen P. Mohun (University of Delaware, United States)

Laura Ann Twagira (Wesleyan University, United States)

Karin Zachmann (Technische Universität München, Germany)

47 - Roundtable: What Might a Global History of Spaceflight Look Like?

Organizers: Roger D. Launius (Smithsonian Institution, United States) and Alexander C. T. Geppert (New York University, United States and NYU Shanghai, China)

Presenters:

Roger D. Launius (Smithsonian Institution, United States): The Longue Durée of Space Exploration and the Amalgamation of a Technological Endeavor

Asif A. Siddiqi (Fordham University, United States): In Place and Left Behind: “Departure Gates” and the Many Global Histories of Space Exploration

Alexander C. T. Geppert (New York University, United States and NYU Shanghai, China): Global Cosmo-Politics and the Planetization of Earth

Michael J. Sheehan (Swansea University, United Kingdom): National and Planetary Imaginaries in the Construction of Space Programs

Erik M. Conway (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, United States): Entangled Histories of Spaceflight: Thoughts on Preserving Nationalism in Global Histories

Xi Lu (Shanghai Institute of Satellite Engineering, China): Globalizing Deep Space Exploration: Cooperation and Win-Win

Monique Laney (Auburn University, United States): Migration, Nation, and Space Exploration

48 - Chinese Technology in Cross-Cultural Context

Chair: Jianjun Mei (Needham Research Institute, United Kingdom)

Wei Qian (University of Science and Technology Beijing, China): Technology Transfer from China to America? A Case Study of Ironworks in Mid-19th Century Kentucky

Hugo Silveira Pereira (Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal): Technopolitics, Technodiplomacy, China, and Portugal: The Railway from Macao to Guangzhou (Late Nineteenth–Early Twentieth Centuries)

Chadwick Wang (Tsinghua University, China), Mingyang Li (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China), and Hongyao Zhang (University of Tokyo, Japan): The Abandoned Tradition and the Unopened Package: On the Failure of the Modern Chinese Sugar Industry

Zhihui Zhang (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China) and Yulin Chen (Hunan University of Science and Technology, China): Space Technology and Geopolitics: Post–Cold War China-U.S. Cooperation and Conflict on Commercial Satellite Launching

49 - Managing Risk in a Diverse World: Intersections of Disability, Race, Class, and Technology in the Creation and Confrontation of Disaster

Sponsor: EDITH

Organizers: Fallon Samuels-Aidoo (Harvard University and Northeastern University, United States) and Anna Åberg (University of Turin, Italy)

Chair and comment: Ashley Carse (Vanderbilt University, United States)

Presenters:

Fallon Samuels-Aidoo (Harvard University and Northeastern University, United States): Disaster Averted? Emergency Services for the American Rail Industry, 1970–1987

Minae Inahara (Osaka University, Japan): A Phenomenological Investigation of Disability Inclusive Disaster Risk Management: Vulnerabilities, Disasters, and Technologies

Philip C. Brown (The Ohio State University, United States): Facing Natural Hazard Disasters in Early Modern Japan

50 - Sexy Problems: Why Do Particular Technological Problems Become Interesting and Attractive at a Certain Moment?

Organizer: Ann Johnson (Cornell University, United States)

Chair and comment: W. Patrick McCray (University of California, Santa Barbara, United States)

Presenters:

Ann Johnson (Cornell University, United States): Cleaning up Combustion: The Quest for a Better Engine

Roger Eardley-Pryor (Chemical Heritage Foundation, United States): Bigger, Longer, Wetter: Stimulating Simulations of Biomolecular Dynamos with Supercomputers in Interdisciplinary Illinois

David C. Brock (Computer History Museum, United States): Build Slide: Presentation Software and the Logics of PowerPoint

51 - Robots in Asia: History, Culture, and Politics (Part II)

Organizer and chair: Chihyung Jeon (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea)

Comment: David Lucsko (Auburn University, United States)

Presenters:

Angela Ndalianis (University of Melbourne, Australia): From Edo karakuri ningyo to 21st Century Japanese Robots

Colin Garvey (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, United States): Risk and Governance of Artificial Intelligence in the USA and Japan

Hee Rin Lee (Indiana University, United States): Individualized Selves of South Korean Home and Social Robotics

52 - Industrial Warfare Emergent: Technological Legacies of the American Civil War

Sponsor: SMiTInG

Organizer and comment: Barton C. Hacker (Smithsonian Institution, United States)

Chair: Margaret Vining (Smithsonian Institution, United States)

Presenters:

Seymour Goodman (Georgia Institute of Technology, United States): The Race to Hampton Roads

Merritt Roe Smith (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States): The Civil War and the Origins of the Global Arms Bazaar, 1865–1890

Jeffrey Larrabee (National Guard Bureau, United States): “A Brief Plea for an Ambulance System”: Lessons Learned and Re-Learned from the Civil War to the World War

53 - Technology Transfer Reconsidered: Three Cases of Transfer from the West to China

Organizer: Lie Sun (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China)

Chair: Baichun Zhang (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China)

Comment: Per Högselius (Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)

Presenters:

Lie Sun (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China): German Krupp and Late Qing Chinese Artillery: Technology Transfer through Trade and Imitation

Bin Wang (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China): The Impact of Modern Railway Technology Transfer to China: The Case of the Kiaotsi Railway, 1898–1914

Jinfang Han (China Association for Science and Technology, China): The Reform of Higher Technical Education Following the Soviet Union’s Model: Beijing Area, 1949–1961

54 - Innovation through Connections

Organizer: Jung Lee (Academia Sinica, Taiwan)

Chair and comment: Suzanne Moon (University of Oklahoma, United States)

Presenters:

Kuang-Chi Hung (National Taiwan University, Taiwan): Scientific Forestry and Ecologies of War in Taiwan during the Japanese Colonial Rule

Sun-sil Oh (Seoul National University, South Korea): Coordinating a Reasonable Power System for South Korea

Jung Lee (Academia Sinica, Taiwan): Beating Twice for Innovation? Thinking Innovation through Papermaking in 19th Century Korea

15.30 - 17.00
SESSION BLOCK 6
Click on session title for more information
55 - Roundtable: Teaching History of Technology and Science and Technology Studies (STS) outside the Euro-Atlantic World

Organizer and chair: Anto Mohsin (Northwestern University in Qatar)

Comment: Clarissa Ai Ling Lee (National University of Malaysia)

Panelists:

Anto Mohsin (Northwestern University in Qatar): Introducing and Teaching Science and Technology Studies at a Media School in Qatar

Ellan F. Spero (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States, and Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore): Photographic Practice as a Tool for Critical Thinking About Technology in Local and Global Contexts

Catelijne Coopmans (National University of Singapore): STS as General Education at Tembusu College, Singapore

C. Ozan Ceyhan (Istanbul University, Turkey): Teaching History of Technology in Turkey

Chihyung Jeon (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea): Pedagogical Challenges in the History of Technology and STS in South Korea

56 - Pacific Crossings: A Roundtable on the Transpacific History of Technology

Organizers: Augustine Sedgewick (Independent Scholar, United States) and Teasel Muir-Harmony (American Institute of Physics, United States)

Chair and comment: Marc S. Rodriguez (Portland State University, United States)

Presenters:

Emily K. Brock (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Germany): Biodiversity as a Technological Challenge: Science, Power, and Trade in a Globalized Southeast Asian Tropical Hardwood Industry

Teasel Muir-Harmony (American Institute of Physics, United States): Selling Spaceflight in the Pacific Orbit: Comparing American Propaganda in Asia, Latin America, and Oceania

Augustine Sedgewick (Independent Scholar, United States): Coffee Production in the Transpacific Commodity Field, 1888–1941

57 - Computation and the Behavioral / Psychological Sciences: Intersecting Histories, Technologies, and Discourses

Organizer: Luke Stark (New York University, United States)

Presenters:

Ekaterina Babintseva (University of Pennsylvania, United States): Self, Computer, and Society: The Development of Computer-Based Education in the United States during the Cold War

Ian Hartman (Northwestern University, United States): “The Yoga of the West”: Biofeedback, Transpersonal Psychology, and the Beginnings of the Quantified Self

Luke Stark (New York University, United States): “It’s Messing with Me, It’s Mind Control”: Psychological Experimentation on Social Media Platforms and the History of A/B Testing

58 - Animals and Technology: On the Land

Organizer and chair: Dolly Jørgensen (Luleå University of Technology, Sweden)

Presenters:

Tamar Novick (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Germany): Documenting Production: The Story of Stavit, a Beastly Technology

Tiago Saraiva (Drexel University, United States): The Modern Evolutionary Synthesis and Pork: Guinea Pigs and Pig Breeding in the New Deal

Otniel E. Dror (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel): Perpetuum Pleasure Mobile

Amy Fletcher (University of Canterbury, New Zealand): Listening to Extinction: Eco-Sound from the Movietone Sound System to Soundscape Ecology

59 - Long-Term Impacts of Joseph Needham’s Science and Civilization in China on the History of Technology I: Asia and Beyond

Organizers: Philip C. Brown (The Ohio State University, United States) and Carl Mitcham (Colorado School of Mines, United States)

Presenters:

Suzanne Moon (University of Oklahoma, United States): Needham in Southeast Asia? The Archive and Expanded Histories of Technology

Xiaolei Shi (Harbin Normal University, China): Changes in the History of Technology in China since Needham’s Work: The Perspective of the History of Mechanical Engineering

Jielin Dong (Soochow University, China) and Wei Li (Sun Yat-sen University, China): The Structure of Science and Technology across History: A “Human Needs” Perspective

Yulin Chen (Hunan University of Science and Technology, China) and Zhihui Zhang (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China): Reflective Studies on SHOT’s Intellectual and Social Organization: The Development Process of SHOT’s Theories, Themes, and Social Organization of the History of Technology

60 - Fashion and Technology: Consumers, Democratization of Luxury, and New Technologies

Organizer: Emanuela Scarpellini (University of Milan, Italy)

Chair and comment: Ruth Oldenziel (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands)

Presenters:

Naoko Inoue (Tokyo Josai University, Japan): Silk Spinning Technology and Its Impact on Japanese Society in the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries: The Democratization of Silk and the Emergence of the New Consumer Society

Miki Sugiura (Hosei University, Japan): Old and New Techniques in Recycling Kimono Clothing: A Connection?

Emanuela Scarpellini (University of Milan, Italy): Science and Technology in the Italian Fashion Industry

61 - Patenting, Promoting, and Politicizing New Technologies: Invention, Innovation, and Ubiquitous Know-How in 18th Century France and Britain

Organizer: Adam Lucas (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Comment: Pamela O. Long (Independent Scholar, United States)

Presenters:

Marie Thébaud-Sorger (National Center for Scientific Research, France): Playing with Scales for Mastering Nature: The Design of Micro-Inventions in 18th Century France and Britain

Benjamin Bothereau (School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences, France): The Imaginary and Technology: Public Lighting Representations in 18th Century Paris

Daryl M. Hafter (Eastern Michigan University, United States): Everybody’s Know-How in the Age of Guild Regulations

Jérôme Baudry (University of Geneva, Switzerland) and Rachel Gostenhofer (Brown University, United States): From Priority to Property: Owning and Disowning Inventions in 18th Century France

62 - Risk and Opportunity in Spaceflight Technology

Organizer: Paul E. Ceruzzi (Smithsonian Institution, United States)

Chair and comment: Alexander C. T. Geppert (New York University, United States and NYU Shanghai, China)

Presenters:

Paul E. Ceruzzi (Smithsonian Institution, United States): The Apollo Guidance Computer, the Integrated Circuit, and the Birth of Silicon Valley, 1962–1972

Ashok Maharaj (Tata Consultancy Services, India): Transnational Networks and Knowledge Flows in the Making and Launching of APPLE: India’s first Geostationary Satellite

Michael J. Neufeld (Smithsonian Institution, United States): The Discovery Program: Competition, Innovation, and Risk in Planetary Exploration

63 - Making Games Go: Hardware and Software at the Intersection of Computer and Game History

Organizer: Laine Nooney (Georgia Institute of Technology, United States)

Chair: Maria Haigh (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States)

Comment: Melanie Swalwell (Flinders University, Australia)

Presenters:

Laine Nooney (Georgia Institute of Technology, United States): Puzzling Engines: Game Design and Software Innovation at Sierra On-Line in the 1980s

Jacob Gaboury (Stony Brook University, United States): Procedure Crystalized: Graphics Card Histories and the Domestication of 3D

Stephanie Dick (Harvard University, United States): Games of Chance in the AI Winter

 

64 - Art and Image in Japan

Chair and comment: Aleksandra Kobiljski (National Center for Scientific Research, France)

Presenters:

Yakup Bektas (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan): Miyazawa Kenji’s Journey to the Stars

Tobias Cheung (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany): Metabolic Space: Kisho Kurokawa’s Future Megalopolis and Its Biotechnic Culture

W. Patrick McCray (University of California, Santa Barbara, United States): Big in Japan: Technology, Art, and Osaka’s Expo ‘70

65 - Bodies and Technologies

Chair: Achintya Kumar Dutta (University of Burdwan, India)

Presenters:

Heong Hong Por (University of Malaya, Malaysia): Keeping the Fighting Strength: Medicine and Knowledge of Bodies as Military Technology during Malaya’s (Counter)Insurgency, 1948–1960

Kyuri Kim (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea): The Ironies of Surveillance: The Effects and Side-Effects of Introducing Technologies for Tuberculosis Surveillance and Governance in South Korea

Alana Staiti (Cornell University, United States): Bones, Skins, and Joints: ANIMAC and the “Body Language” of Computerized Motion

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